Loose Objects, Car Accidents and Your Safety

Thirteen thousand. That's how many people are injured each year by loose objects in the car turning into projectiles. You know what I'm talking about: water bottles, library books waiting to be returned, computers, phones, and toys. All can become extremely dangerous when involved in a car accident, or even a very sudden stop.

Gruber Law Offices, LLC, offers this example "At 55 miles per hour, a 20-pound object hits with 1,000 pounds of force-so powerful that a suitcase can literally seer the arm of a crash test dummy." And, of course, even if an object isn't heavy, it can be distracting to have something whizz by your head when you are trying to react to a crisis situation. Suddenly, an already dangerous accident can become even more risky.

Here's just a few tips to limit the risk of projectiles hurting you or your passengers:

  • Declutter your car on a regular basis.
  • Place heavy objects in your trunk or cargo area (computer bags, purses, backpacks, etc.).
  • Use storage areas when an item is not in use. Cell phones, wallets, and snacks can often fit in a middle console, for example. 
  • Pack heavier items underneath the lighter ones to minimize the chance of them to fly up (for example, when packing for a road trip or bringing groceries home); better yet, strap them down.

It is true that few people (I'm looking at my fellow parents!) ever have a vehicle completely void of personal items. However, by being aware of the risks, you can take some of these few easy steps to minimize the danger to you and your loved ones.

 

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